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Home » DHS-8 Questionnaire Review - Archived » Core questionnaire: Nutrition » Updated Indicators for Infant and Young Child Feeding (IYCF)
Re: Updated Indicators for Infant and Young Child Feeding (IYCF) [message #17020 is a reply to message #16777] Fri, 15 March 2019 07:03 Go to previous messageGo to previous message
Rolf Klemm is currently offline  Rolf Klemm
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Registered: March 2019
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Helen Keller International (HKI) endorses the recommendation for inclusion of updated indicators for infant and young child feeding in DHS-8.
There is a need to expand understanding of diets among children under two years of age in the face of evolving food environments. Many countries combatting child undernutrition are now concurrently struggling with overnutrition. Studies by HKI and others have shown marked consumption of unhealthy foods such as sugar-sweetened beverages (SSB) and junk foods among young children in Asia and Africa (Huffman et al., 2014), with rates among 12-23 month-old children as high as 74% in Dakar, Senegal, 84% in Kathmandu Valley, Nepal, and 87% in Bandung, Indonesia (Feeley et al., 2017, Pries et al., 2017; Green et al., in press). Further research among 1-2 year olds in Kathmandu Valley has also found that nearly one-quarter of energy intakes from foods come from unhealthy snack foods/beverages (Pries et al., in press).
DHS measurement of unhealthy dietary patterns during the complementary feeding period, such as consumption of nutrient-poor foods (SSB and junk foods) and low intake of fruits/vegetables, would allow tracking of trends over time within countries, and comparisons across countries/regions in varying stages of the double burden of malnutrition. This data would be invaluable for targeting of programs, and for informing policy to safeguard young child nutrition. Where data indicate high consumption of SSB and junk foods or low consumption of fruits/vegetables among young children, governments and NGOs such as HKI can focus programmatic efforts on increasing consumption of nutrient-rich, locally available foods during the complementary feeding period and developing strategies to limit consumption of unhealthy foods and beverages.

References:
Huffman, S. L., Piwoz, E. G., Vosti, S. A. & Dewey, K. G. Babies, soft drinks and snacks: a concern in low and middle-income countries? Matern. Child Nutr. 10, 562574 (2014).
Feeley, A. B. et al. Promotion and consumption of commercially produced foods among children: Situation analysis in an urban setting in Senegal. Matern. Child Nutr. 12, 6476 (2016).
Pries, A.M. et al. Consumption of commercially produced snack foods and sugar-sweetened beverages during the complementary feeding period in four African and Asian urban contexts. Matern. Child Nutr. 13, e12412 (2017).
Green, M. et al. High proportions of children below 3 years of age consume commercially produced snack foods and sugar-sweetened beverages in Bandung City, Indonesia. Matern. Child Nutr. (in press)

 
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