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child nutrition inequality [message #13296] Mon, 16 October 2017 05:53 Go to next message
Nilam is currently offline  Nilam
Messages: 1
Registered: September 2017
Location: Karachi
Member
I am working on child nutrition inequality, using PDHS 2012-13. i am using variable hc70 for Stunting by limiting the variable from -2 to -6. the R square of regression analysis (OLS) is very low (0.05). how can i fix it?
PS: i have already tried linear log model.


Regards
Nilam
Re: child nutrition inequality [message #13328 is a reply to message #13296] Thu, 19 October 2017 13:25 Go to previous message
Reduced-For(u)m
Messages: 292
Registered: March 2013
Senior Member

I have some thoughts on this, but I don't know how helpful they would be.

1. If you are interested in inequality, it is not at all obvious you'd want to drop any non-stunted/wasted children. Inequality is usually about the spread of the entire distribution, not the right tail.

2. It is not at all clear why you'd be worried about the R^2 of the regression... what is your model trying to do that makes the R^2 matter in a way that the standard errors on your variables of interest aren't the more important measure of precision? I just mean - why do you care about the R^2?

3. You can't really use a log model with negative values, so it is hard for me to understand how you tried that and it didn't work.

4. If you gave me a little bit more context I might be able to offer more concrete suggestions, but in general I think this question is too broad of a statistics question to be appropriate for the DHS staff on the forum. It sounds more like you need a statistical consultant, and while there are some commenters here like me who can sometimes help, it is really outside the bounds of what this forum is designed to do.
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